Why is Furuhashi so good?

Cameron Sanders
Cameron Sanders

Why is Furuhashi so good?

Just learned that he planned to kill Kurapika and Chrollo in that episode.

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Angel Green
Angel Green

Just learned that he planned to kill Kurapika and Chrollo in that episode.
Source?
Fucking wot

Luis Miller
Luis Miller

There are various sources but I don't have any that is 100% sure.

Kayden Edwards
Kayden Edwards

Nevermind, I just realized what I quoted was the storyboard for Kurapika's death.

Colton Nelson
Colton Nelson

(An interesting analysis)

The 1999 series didn't have too many moments of filler in its latter half, but the instances it did have threw off continuity.

Firstly, the "an eye for an eye" thing stems from phrase Killua states throughout the 1999 series and eventually becomes a recurring theme. I believe that it first makes its appearance between the second and third phases of the Hunter Exam. There was a filler character named Anita who stowed away on the Hunter Association's airship for the sake of revenge against Killua, whom she believed to have killed her father (it ended up being another Zoldyck). The major idea was that people get what's coming to them; people who do "bad things" to others are always punished. This filler set the precedent for the rest of the show, as director Kazuhiro Furuhashi continued to explore and connect these themes to canon moments. "An eye for an eye" became one of the series' filler catchphrases (there are plenty). And once Nen was introduced, a second portion was added to the catchphrase to make a rhyming pun: "An eye for an eye, Nen for Nen" (目には目を、念には念を Me ni wa me wo, Nen ni wa Nen wo).

Now I've mentioned before that Kurapika is a different character in the 1999 series. This is because if you pay close attention, there are some key differences in the ways that Kurapika responds to one of the most major trials in his life: the murder of Uvogin. In the Nippon Animation version, Kurapika is disgusted with himself for having killed a man. He can't stand it. He nearly retches. Throws away his bloodstained clothes. Gets physically ill from having committed such an act. But in the manga, Kurapika doesn't even flinch after killing Uvogin. In fact--his expression doesn't change a bit. It's cold and resolved at the same time. Despite being such a moralist in the beginning of the series, you start to realize that it was all talk and that Kurapika is a much darker-minded character than he originally portrayed himself to be.

Isaiah Campbell
Isaiah Campbell

In the Hunter Exam arc, Kurapika at first is on a bit of a high horse. He finds Leorio reprehensible for his desire for money and carries himself in a pure manner. Kurapika states that his goal is to become a Blacklist Hunter in order to only capture the Phantom Troupe. But the more we learn about Kurapika, the more we begin to question it. During the First Phase, he has a conversation with Leorio in which he states that he isn't adverse to infiltrating society's underworld in order to arrest the members of the Phantom Troupe. Then in the Third Phase, Kurapika nearly kills Majitani for disguising himself as a member of the Troupe and thereafter threatens to do it. Gon is the only one to take notice of and consider Kurapika's change in demeanor.

This comes to a head when Kurapika first encounters a member of the Phantom Troupe. He gets irrationally angry and impulsive. All of his morals go out of the window and the only thing on his mind is blood instead of justice. Furuhashi might've believed that Kurapika was in inner turmoil over his personal morality and his sense of justice. In fact, he goes so far as to imply that Kurapika was indoctrinated by the Kurta clan. In episode 58, he nearly breaks down whilst chanting a prayer that goes as follows:

"The sun upon my face, the grass beneath my feet.
My skin cleansed by the water of a lake.
My spirit soars among the clouds,
my path illuminated by the moon and stars.
I honor my ancestors for bringing me to this place
and defend my brethren with my dying breath.
I will step forward to humbly share in their joy
and carry the burden of their sorrows.
By my word and deed, their name will live on...
For my Scarlet Eyes and my blood are one with theirs;
I will take up the mantle, and accept any wrongdoing I commit,
to preserve the Kurta people, until we are redeemed forever.
On the Scarlet Eyes, I swear."

Carter Long
Carter Long

Key lines include "defend my brethren with my dying breath," "carry the burden of their sorrows," and "I will take up the mantle, and accept any wrongdoing I commit, to preserve the Kurta people, until we are redeemed forever." When you think about it, Kurapika's clan was eradicated when he was only twelve. Therefore, he would have been taught this prayer in his childhood. You get the sense that Kurapika's revenge (in the 1999 series) isn't solely being driven by his own will--he's following his ancestors' will and it conflicts with his personal moral code. So his anguish over killing Uvogin is because he knows that he's done something wrong. He feels guilt for having done it. Therefore, an eye for an eye. Blood will be repaid with blood. Uvogin was killed by Kurapika for having killed his clan, so Furuhashi intended Chrollo Lucilfer and Kurapika kill each other to settle their grudges. There are scenes and motifs Furuhashi places within the Nippon Animation version foreshadowing Kurapika's intended demise. The bloody moon dripping downward, Kurapika's floating corpse in a lake of blood in episode 45, etc.

Of course, these are all pretty much the opposite of what the creator intended. Kurapika doesn't feel guilt over his actions even though we (as viewers) believe that he should. Uvogin's murder is ugly, merciless, and brutal. Kurapika is portrayed almost as a villain in this scene in the manga. And Chrollo is the opposite because he doesn't hold grudges like that. In fact, he champions ignoring Kurapika in order to focus on the Troupe's true objective.

http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/bbs/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=908002&start=105

Daniel Hughes
Daniel Hughes

Interesting.

William Young
William Young

Thanks for that, user. I always felt that anime was pretty different from the manga in terms of characterisation.

99 will never get a BD release
The CA arc will never ever get a 99 style adaptation

Kill me

Alexander Scott
Alexander Scott

I do think 99 is a good watch but killing off Kurapika this way is hack-tier, I'm glad Togashi rejected it.

Nathan Robinson
Nathan Robinson

I don't know, this seems to fit, and that would have prevented the following OVAs that are quite inferior in my opinion.

Still, might have been interesting. How is it hack-tier?

Nolan Jones
Nolan Jones

It's incredibly corny.
Furuhashi intended for Kurapika to engage in a climactic battle against the leader of the Phantom Troupe, both men dying in the process (in order to round out the "eye for an eye" motif in the 1999 series).
Literally loses one of his eyes
The 1999 series was supposed to end spoiler[with Kurapika dying in Leorio's arms in a tearful goodbye.
Do you not realize how awful and cheesy this all sounds? The manga is infinitely better than this shit.

And the OVAs are great because they stick more to the original story, it even had some filler that improved the source material.

Chase Ward
Chase Ward

Which fillers?

You might be right for the ending, yes I realize it might sound corny and cheesy (like often with these main character dies ending) but well this seems to conclude the motif correctly, although that's not what I'm searching for when watching an anime.

I liked Kenshin Tsuioku-hen's dramatic storyline, I think it might have been on the same level or something.

Kayden Perez
Kayden Perez

Which fillers?
I haven't watched the OVAs in a long time, but I recall liking the Pakunoda cat/meteor city filler. I thought that was pretty good.

Wyatt Allen
Wyatt Allen

Oh yeah, this. I just rewatched the OVA, I wondered if that was filler or not. It was nice.

Connor Sullivan
Connor Sullivan

Didn't watch the OVA yet, but the cat is present in the manga.

Austin Thompson
Austin Thompson

The OVA expands on the cat scene.

Daniel Lee
Daniel Lee

This is the kind of quality we could be getting.
Watching Rurouni Kenshin OVA in 1080p had me almost in tears for how glorious it was.
If it was possible to Kickstart a remaster I would easily pledge 300$ for it.

Cooper White
Cooper White

Give up, the tapes probably have been destroyed

Thomas Howard
Thomas Howard

holy shit, how did they do the reflections?

Wyatt Watson
Wyatt Watson

Yeah, It's almost certain.
Nippon is in a zombie like state, but has still not gone bankrupt. Obviously I have no expectations, but who knows.

Joseph Gonzalez
Joseph Gonzalez

Now I feel like checking 99 again, Art direction and framing were top notch. A shame there's no optimal version available.

Logan Williams
Logan Williams

If Heidi and Akage no Anne got BDs, I don't see why HxH 1999 can't.

Hudson Mitchell
Hudson Mitchell

Magic

Hunter Brooks
Hunter Brooks

It's all Madhouse fault

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